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March 2013 posts

It's not about a number.

I'm not a shopper. Since I work from home, I rarely get new clothes.

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The other day I noticed that New York + Co had a 50% off everything sale and went in. The saleswoman said to me, "You look like you'd rather be anywhere but here." 

I told her that I am not fan of clothes shopping, and she called me "Cute," and "Small." 

Small. Snort.

I laughed, and realized soon why I have so much dismay for clothes shopping. THE FITTING ROOM. THE LIGHTS.

THE VARICOSE VEINS. I have the legs of an 80 year old woman.

It's not about SIZES or the number on my scale, because I am nearly to my lowest weight.  I reached my lowest weight just after one year post op, I hit 149 pounds for one day and regained immediately.  

I am 156 pounds today.  

I still don't like the melted candle puddle of skin that I have -- nine years later. Full honesty, I am FINE with it once I am wearing appropriate undergarments and everything is in it's place, but even in a size 8P (I also bought a pair of 6P) - sometimes you feel like a puddle of flesh.

It's not about a number.


Obesity Help National Conference 2013

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Wait up OH.

I thought we did the tenth a few years ago?  Talk to me.

Irvine, CA. (March 23, 2013) – Obesity Help -

ObesityHelp is excited to announce the 10th Annual ObesityHelp National Conference at the Crowne Plaza in Anaheim, California on October 4th and 5th, 2013. The ObesityHelp National Conference is a celebration of health and wellness for those navigating their weight loss surgery journey.  You’ll walk away inspired, motivated and with a larger support system than you started with. You will be part of change, gain knowledge from experienced professionals, and witness (or have your own) non-scale victories right at the conference.

Continue reading "Obesity Help National Conference 2013" »


Good DOES GOOD - #YWM2013 #BBGC Fundraiser

In 139 days the BBGC is descending upon Phoenix, Arizona for the #YWM2013 with the Obesity Action Coalition.  This is the 2nd Annual Event -- and we want to be a bigger part of it.  Last year several of us traveled to Dallas, Texas for the 1st Annual YWM Event and LOVED EVERY MINUTE of it.   Note:

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This year -- we decided we want to put a ring on it.  

In addition to fundraising for the Walk From Obesity (Walks From Obesities?  Plural... Remember last year - $7,300.) and doing good the Bariatric Bad Girls Club is sponsoring a portion of the #YWM2013 event. I implore YOUR business or group to do the same, it is a worthwhile cause.

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To help the BBGC do good -- we are fundraising -- as I am just one person but together 
WE ARE MANY --

“One of the marvelous things about community is that it enables us to welcome and help people in a way we couldn't as individuals. When we pool our strength and share the work and responsibility, we can welcome many people, even those in deep distress, and perhaps help them find self-confidence and inner healing.” 

― Jean Vanier

  • Our BBGC ink injected wristbands are black debossed silicone wristbands with HOT pink colored ink injected into the engraved letters.  Pretend they are below, cause my photo is NOT here yet.  
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  • The bracelets are IN PRODUCTION  (I'm watching the tracking...) and will be SHIPPED AS SOON AS THEY ARRIVE.  You will receive a bracelet in a few weeks.
  • Alternatively if you DO NOT WANT A BRACELET and want to SUPPORT THE BBGC CAUSE, you may also simply donate directly to contactmeltingmama@gmail.com at www.paypal.com - below
  •  


Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update

The Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient has been updated for the first time since 2008.   There are changes and updates and suggestions for your clinicians - the entire text is available online below -

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Download here -

Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient - 2013 Update -

Abstract: The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of
clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the
evidence and subjective factors per protocol.

Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery forpatients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues.

A lifetime history of substance abuse disorder is more likely in bariatric surgery candidates compared with the general population (211 [EL 3, SS]). In contrast, current alcohol and substance abuse in bariatric surgery candidates is low compared with the general population (211 [EL 3, SS]). The LABS study demonstrated that certain groups including those with regular preoperative alcohol consumption, alcohol use disorder, recreational drug use, smokers, and those undergoing RYGB had a higher risk of postoperative alcohol use disorder (212 [EL 2, PCS]). A web-based questionnaire study indicated that 83% of respondents continued to consume alcohol after RYGB, with 28.4% indicating a problem controlling alcohol (213 [EL 3, SS]). In a prospective study with 13- to 15-year follow-up after RYGB, there was an increase in alcohol abuse (2.6% presurgery to 5.1% postsurgery) but a decrease in alcohol dependence (10.3% presurgery versus 2.6% postsurgery) (214 [EL 2, PCS]).  In a survey 6-10 years after RYGB, 7.1% of patients had alcohol abuse or dependence before surgery, which was unchanged postoperatively, whereas 2.9% admitted to alcohol dependence after surgery but not before surgery (215 [EL 3, SS]). Finally, in a retrospective review of a large electronic database, 2%-6% of bariatric surgery admissions were positive for a substance abuse history (216 [EL 3, SS]). Interestingly, 2 studies have demonstrated better weight loss outcomes among patients with a past substance abuse history compared with those without past alcohol abuse.

Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues.

Obesity continues to be a major public health problem in the United States, with more than one third of adults considered obese in 2009- 2010, as defined by a body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m2 (1 [EL 3,
SS]). Obesity has been associated with an increased hazard ratio for all-cause mortality (2 [EL 3, SS]), as well as significant medical and psychological co-morbidity. Indeed, obesity is not only a chronic
medical condition but should be regarded as a bona fide disease state (3 [EL 4, NE]). Nonsurgical management can effectively induce 5%-10% weight loss and improve health in severely obese
individuals (4 [EL 1, RCT]) resulting in cardiometabolic benefit. Bariatric surgery procedures are indicated for patients with clinically severe obesity. Currently, these procedures are the most successful and durable treatment for obesity. Furthermore, although overall obesity rates and bariatric surgery procedures have plateaued in the United States, rates of severe obesity are still increasing and now
there are approximately 15 million people in the United States with a BMI 40 kg/m2 (1 [EL 3, SS]; 5 [EL 3, SS]). Only 1% of the clinically eligible population receives surgical treatment for obesity
(6 [EL 3, SS]). Given the potentially increased need for bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity, it is apparent that clinical practice guidelines (CPG) on the subject keep pace and are kept current.

Since the 2008 TOS/ASMBS/AACE CPG for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient (7 [EL 4; CPG]), significant data have emerged regarding a broader range of available surgeries for the treatment of obesity. A PubMed computerized literature search (performed on December 15, 2012) using the search term ‘‘bariatric surgery’’ reveals a total of 14,287 publications with approximately 6800 citations from 2008 to 2012. Updated CPG are therefore needed to guide clinicians in the care of the bariatric surgery patient.

What are the salient advances in bariatric surgery since 2008?

  • The sleeve gastrectomy (SG; laparoscopic SG [LSG]) has demonstrated benefits comparable to other bariatric procedures and is no longer considered investigational (8 [EL 4, NE]).  
  • A national risk-adjusted database positions SG between the laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in terms of weight loss, co-morbidity resolution, and complications (9 [EL 2, PCS]). 
  • The number of SG procedures has increased with greater third-party pay or coverage (9 [EL 2, PCS]). 
  • Other unique procedures are gaining attention, such as gastric plication, electrical neuromodulation, and endoscopic sleeves, but these procedures lack sufficient outcome evidence and therefore remain investigational and outside the scope of this CPG update.
  • There is also emerging data on bariatric surgery in specific patient populations, including those with mild to moderate obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D) with class I obesity (BMI 30-34.9 kg/m2), and patients at the extremes of age. Clinical studies have demonstrated short-term efficacy of LAGB in mild to moderate obesity (10 [EL 1, RCT]; 11 [EL 2, PCS]; 12 [EL 2, PCSA]; 13 [EL 3, SS]), leading the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve the use of LAGB for patients with a BMI of 30 to 35 kg/m2 with T2D or other obesity-related co-morbidities (14 [EL 4, NE]). Although controversial, this position was incorporated by the International Diabetes Federation, which proposed eligibility for bariatric procedures in a subset of patients with T2D and a BMI of 30 kg/m2 with suboptimal glycemic control despite optimal medical management (15 [EL 4, NE]). Thus, the term metabolic surgery has emerged to describe procedures intended to treat T2D as well as reduce cardiometabolic risk factors. In 1 study, metabolic surgery was shown to induce T2D remission in up to 72% of subjects at 2 years; however, this number was reduced to 36% at 10 years (16 [EL 2, PCS]). In a more recent study, patients who underwent RYGB sustained diabetes remission rates of 62% at 6 years (17 [EL 2, PCS]). The overall long-term effect of bariatric surgery on T2D remission rates is currently not well studied. Additionally, for patients who have T2D recurrence several years after surgery, the legacy effects of a remission period on their long-term cardiovascular risk is not known. The mechanism of T2D remission has not been completely elucidated but appears to include an incretin effect (SG and RYGB procedures) in addition to caloric restriction and weight loss. These findings potentially expand the eligible population for bariatric and metabolic surgery.

Download here - via -

Clinical practice guidelines for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient—2013 update: Cosponsored by american association of clinical endocrinologists, The obesity society, and american society for metabolic & bariatric surgery* (pages S1–S27)

Jeffrey I. Mechanick, Adrienne Youdim, Daniel B. Jones, W. Timothy Garvey, Daniel L. Hurley, M. Molly McMahon, Leslie J. Heinberg, Robert Kushner, Ted D. Adams, Scott Shikora, John B. Dixon and Stacy Brethauer

Article first published online: 26 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/oby.20461


 


After weight-loss surgery, new gut bacteria keep obesity away?

ENTHRALLING -

New York Times -

The research also suggests that a popular weight-loss operation, gastric bypass, which shrinks the stomach and rearranges the intestines, seems to work in part by shifting the balance of bacteria in the digestive tract. People who have the surgery generally lose 65 percent to 75 percent of their excess weight, but scientists have not fully understood why.

Now, the researchers are saying that bacterial changes may account for 20 percent of the weight loss.

The findings mean that eventually, treatments that adjust the microbe levels, or “microbiota,” in the gut may be developed to help people lose weight without surgery, said Dr. Lee M. Kaplan, director of the obesity, metabolism and nutrition institute at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and an author of a study published Wednesday in Science Translational Medicine.

Not everyone who hopes to lose weight wants or needs surgery to do it, he said. About 80 million people in the United States are obese, but only 200,000 a year have bariatric operations.

“There is a need for other therapies,” Dr. Kaplan said. “In no way is manipulating the microbiota going to mimic all the myriad effects of gastric bypass. But if this could produce 20 percent of the effects of surgery, it will still be valuable.”

In people, microbial cells outnumber human ones, and the new studies reflect a growing awareness of the crucial role played by the trillions of bacteria and other microorganisms that live in their own ecosystem in the gut. Perturbations there can have profound and sometimes devastating effects.

One example is infection with a bacterium called C. difficile, which sometimes takes hold in people receiving antibiotics for other illnesses. The drugs can wipe out other organisms that would normally keep C. difficile in check. Severe cases can be life-threatening, and the medical profession is gradually coming to accept the somewhat startling idea that sometimes the best therapy is a fecal transplant — from a healthy person to the one who is sick, to replenish the population of “good germs.”

Dr. Kaplan said his group’s experiments were the first to try to find out if microbial changes could account for some of the weight loss after gastric bypass. Earlier studies had shown that the microbiota of an obese person changed significantly after the surgery, becoming more like that of someone who was thin. But was the change from the surgery itself, or from the weight loss that followed the operation? And did the microbial change have any effects of its own?

Because it would be difficult and time-consuming to study these questions in people, the researchers used mice, which they had fattened up with a rich diet. One group had gastric bypass operations, and two other groups had “sham” operations in which the animals’ intestines were severed and sewn back together. The point was to find out whether just being cut open, without having the bypass, would have an effect on weight or gut bacteria. One sham group was kept on the rich food, while the other was put on a weight-loss diet.

In the bypass mice, the microbial populations quickly changed, and the mice lost weight. In the sham group, the microbiota did not change much — even in those on the weight-loss diet.

Next, the researchers transferred intestinal contents from each of the groups into other mice, which lacked their own intestinal bacteria. The animals that received material from the bypass mice rapidly lost weight; stool from mice that had the sham operations had no effect.

Exactly how the altered intestinal bacteria might cause weight loss is not yet known, the researchers said. But somehow the microbes seem to rev up metabolism so that the animals burn off more energy.

A next step, Dr. Kaplan said, may be to take stool from people who have had gastric bypass and implant it into mice to see if causes them to lose weight. Then the same thing could be tried from person to person.

“In addition, we’ve identified four subsets of bacteria that seem to be most specifically enhanced by the bypass,” Dr. Kaplan said. “Another approach would be to see if any or all of those individual bacteria could mediate the effects, rather than having to transfer stool.”

A second study by a different group found that overweight people may be more likely to harbor a certain type of intestinal microbe. The microbes may contribute to weight gain by helping other organisms to digest certain nutrients, making more calories available. That study was published Tuesday in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

The study involved 792 people who had their breath analyzed to help diagnose digestive orders. They agreed to let researchers measure the levels of hydrogen and methane; elevated levels indicate the presence of a microbe called Methanobrevibacter smithii. The people with the highest readings on the breath test were more likely to be heavier and have more body fat, and the researchers suspect that the microbes may be at least partly responsible for their obesity.

This type of organism may have been useful thousands of years ago, when people ate moreroughage and needed all the help they could get to squeeze every last calorie out of their food. But modern diets are much richer, said an author of the study, Dr. Ruchi Mathur, director of the diabetes outpatient clinic at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

“Our external environment is changing faster than our internal one,” Dr. Mathur said. Studies are under way, she said, to find out whether getting rid of this particular microbe will help people lose weight.


And what then?

“In case you never get a second chance: don't be afraid!"

"And what if you do get a second chance?" "You take it!” 

― C. JoyBell C.

 

I am wondering if someone out there is holding a voo doo doll of me and hastily stabbing pins everywhere but in me. Quit it.  You're missing the target.  

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We are wrapping up the end of March over here with the third (..fourth?) major life-changing event of 2013.  

I thought that if I did not blog about the first (...as much as I have wanted to, I was told no and I have been SCREAMING on the inside!  Still.  AM.  :x) or second (more?) that these things would not occur in threes or more but they do.  I still haven't written, much at all actually.  

Because stop.

Currently - my father is sitting in the Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center in Boston, MA awaiting a Triple Bypass Heart Surgery on Friday morning after two RED FLAG WARNINGS that landed him in the ER.  

11 years ago, he had a stent placed after a mild heart-attack.  These warnings (DO NOT IGNORE YOUR HEART, PEOPLE!) happened just after he lost his job and likely stress was of no help.

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What is a Triple Bypass?  

When one of the heart's arteries gets blocked and a person has a heart attack, one common procedure is to perform heart surgery and sew in a new piece of blood vessel to bridge over (bypass) the blockage. In many cases, the surgeon will fix not only the immediate problem, but also other arteries on the heart that are starting to look blocked. If the surgeon repairs three of the arteries, it is called a triple bypass. If four arteries are repaired, it's a quadruple bypass.

The positives?  

He's losing weight rapidly while in the hospital.  He had lost weight in a medically-supervised plan with his physician's office just prior to this event, but now he's busted into the 200's.

He's off the nicotine, and mentioned that the nurses kept trying to slip him nicotine-patches and he doesn't crave them.  It's been nearly a week, smoke-free!  This is a huge deal.  Hopefully after surgery and rehab he can maintain living smoke-free, he's done it before.

He can rock this.

He appreciates your well-wishes.

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Shane Koyczan: "To This Day" ... for the bullied and beautiful

Shane Koyczan:

  • "To This Day" ... for the bullied and beautiful

This. Man.   Yes this is a complilation of the video I shared before -- it has MORE.  

To This Day


When I was a kid
I used to think that pork chops and karate chops
were the same thing
I thought they were both pork chops
and because my grandmother thought it was cute
and because they were my favourite
she let me keep doing it

not really a big deal

one day
before I realized fat kids are not designed to climb trees
I fell out of a tree
and bruised the right side of my body

I didn’t want to tell my grandmother about it
because I was afraid I’d get in trouble
for playing somewhere that I shouldn’t have been

a few days later the gym teacher noticed the bruise
and I got sent to the principal’s office
from there I was sent to another small room
with a really nice lady
who asked me all kinds of questions
about my life at home

I saw no reason to lie
as far as I was concerned
life was pretty good
I told her “whenever I’m sad
my grandmother gives me karate chops”

this led to a full scale investigation
and I was removed from the house for three days
until they finally decided to ask how I got the bruises

news of this silly little story quickly spread through the school
and I earned my first nickname

pork chop

to this day
I hate pork chops

I’m not the only kid
who grew up this way
surrounded by people who used to say
that rhyme about sticks and stones
as if broken bones
hurt more than the names we got called
and we got called them all
so we grew up believing no one
would ever fall in love with us
that we’d be lonely forever
that we’d never meet someone
to make us feel like the sun
was something they built for us
in their tool shed
so broken heart strings bled the blues
as we tried to empty ourselves
so we would feel nothing
don’t tell me that hurts less than a broken bone
that an ingrown life
is something surgeons can cut away
that there’s no way for it to metastasize

it does

she was eight years old
our first day of grade three
when she got called ugly
we both got moved to the back of the class
so we would stop get bombarded by spit balls
but the school halls were a battleground
where we found ourselves outnumbered day after wretched day
we used to stay inside for recess
because outside was worse
outside we’d have to rehearse running away
or learn to stay still like statues giving no clues that we were there
in grade five they taped a sign to her desk
that read beware of dog

to this day
despite a loving husband
she doesn’t think she’s beautiful
because of a birthmark
that takes up a little less than half of her face
kids used to say she looks like a wrong answer
that someone tried to erase
but couldn’t quite get the job done
and they’ll never understand
that she’s raising two kids
whose definition of beauty
begins with the word mom
because they see her heart
before they see her skin
that she’s only ever always been amazing

he
was a broken branch
grafted onto a different family tree
adopted
but not because his parents opted for a different destiny
he was three when he became a mixed drink
of one part left alone
and two parts tragedy
started therapy in 8th grade
had a personality made up of tests and pills
lived like the uphills were mountains
and the downhills were cliffs
four fifths suicidal
a tidal wave of anti depressants
and an adolescence of being called popper
one part because of the pills
and ninety nine parts because of the cruelty
he tried to kill himself in grade ten
when a kid who still had his mom and dad
had the audacity to tell him “get over it” as if depression
is something that can be remedied
by any of the contents found in a first aid kit

to this day
he is a stick of TNT lit from both ends
could describe to you in detail the way the sky bends
in the moments before it’s about to fall
and despite an army of friends
who all call him an inspiration
he remains a conversation piece between people
who can’t understand
sometimes becoming drug free
has less to do with addiction
and more to do with sanity

we weren’t the only kids who grew up this way
to this day
kids are still being called names
the classics were
hey stupid
hey spaz
seems like each school has an arsenal of names
getting updated every year
and if a kid breaks in a school
and no one around chooses to hear
do they make a sound?
are they just the background noise
of a soundtrack stuck on repeat
when people say things like
kids can be cruel?
every school was a big top circus tent
and the pecking order went
from acrobats to lion tamers
from clowns to carnies
all of these were miles ahead of who we were
we were freaks
lobster claw boys and bearded ladies
oddities
juggling depression and loneliness playing solitaire spin the bottle
trying to kiss the wounded parts of ourselves and heal
but at night
while the others slept
we kept walking the tightrope
it was practice
and yeah
some of us fell

but I want to tell them
that all of this shit
is just debris
leftover when we finally decide to smash all the things we thought
we used to be
and if you can’t see anything beautiful about yourself
get a better mirror
look a little closer
stare a little longer
because there’s something inside you
that made you keep trying
despite everyone who told you to quit
you built a cast around your broken heart
and signed it yourself
you signed it
“they were wrong”
because maybe you didn’t belong to a group or a click
maybe they decided to pick you last for basketball or everything
maybe you used to bring bruises and broken teeth
to show and tell but never told
because how can you hold your ground
if everyone around you wants to bury you beneath it
you have to believe that they were wrong

they have to be wrong

why else would we still be here?
we grew up learning to cheer on the underdog
because we see ourselves in them
we stem from a root planted in the belief
that we are not what we were called we are not abandoned cars stalled out and sitting empty on a highway
and if in some way we are
don’t worry
we only got out to walk and get gas
we are graduating members from the class of
fuck off we made it
not the faded echoes of voices crying out
names will never hurt me

of course
they did

but our lives will only ever always
continue to be
a balancing act
that has less to do with pain
and more to do with beauty.


Live ON and be yourself. #noh8

"No freedom until we're equal, damn right I support it."  

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We press play, don't press pause
Progress, march on
With the veil over our eyes
We turn our back on the cause
Till the day that my uncles can be united by law
When kids are walking 'round the hallway plagued by pain in their heart
A world so hateful some would rather die than be who they are
And a certificate on paper isn't gonna solve it all
But it's a damn good place to start
No law is gonna change us
We have to change us
Whatever God you believe in
We come from the same one
Strip away the fear
Underneath it's all the same love
About time that we raised up


THIGH GAP!? WHAT. THE. EFF?!

A friend posted on Facebook this morning -

"I just watched a news blip about a new teenage girl/young female obsession: the "thigh gap", ie: in order to be beautiful, you must have a large gap between your thighs when your knees are touching. It's one thing if your body is naturally made this way, but it's another to starve yourself to attain an unnatural shape. I can guarantee, no man every looked at Kate Upton, Cindy Crawford, Claudia Schiffer, or Marilyn Monroe and thought: "Man, she's hot, but I wish she had more thigh gap."

Let me just say, in full disclosure, it looks much more desperate on grown-ass adult women.  Cut. it. out.


#AEOSKINNYSKINNY Jeans are FOS

Wait, WHAT?

I know I spend way too much time in malls with four kids and two teens, but, uh, no...

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And the sad thing is, half the kids in the middle and high schools already wear pants that appear painted on.  

Thankfully, hopefully? It's a joke, American Eagle Outfitters played us and you fell for it.  :x  You (or your kids) actually tried to buy them.

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Although, wicked smaht way to get people on a mailing list.

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Buy One Tanks A Lot, Get One Long Leg Shaper $45 Value FREE!

From Slimpressions -

  • From March 22 until March 24, 2013 at midnight EST, get a FREE Long Leg Shaper ($45) when you purchase one Tanks A Lot. 
  • Get the best of both worlds from our Top Sleekret and Bottom Line Collections to shape, hide, and lift where you want it. The Tanks A Lot and Long Leg Shaper are two of Slimpressions' most popular confidencewear.  
  • Create a smooth spring silhouette today.
  • LOVE.

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CVS to workers: Tell us how much you weigh or it'll cost you $600 a year

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

CVS to workers: Tell us how much you weigh or it'll cost you!  SHAME SHAME!

Via Bitch Media

"Workplace wellness incentive programs are not a new phenomenon, but the Internet is in turmoil today over a recent announcement by the national drugstore chain CVS. Beginning in May, CVS will require employees on the company’s insurance plan to undergo health testing—including body mass indexing and blood glucose testing—or face a $600 annual penalty.  

The company’s rationale? Coercing employees to submit to health testing will provide incentive for workers to get—and stay—in shape. Employees’ health information will not be accessible to the company itself, but rather to a third party responsible for administering company insurance benefits. Reportedly, with the advent of Obamacare and rising healthcare costs, practices like this threaten to become more commonplace in the corporate environment. 

Attention everyone, everywhere. If you’ve been struggling for years to get in shape, whatever that means to you, you can just quit whatever it is you’re doing right now because CVS has got it all figured out. It turns out whatever silliness you were attempting, you just didn’t have the proper incentive. Except, as it happens, this regimen already exists and it’s called humiliation and fat-shaming. Have someone tell you you’re overweight, or pay a major fine.

Then there’s the next major issue. CVS, which really should by keyed in to the latest, or at the very least some,health news, ought to know Body Mass Index (BMI) is by no means an accurate indicator of health. As Keith Devlin over at NPR pointed out back in 2009, there are at least 10 good reasons BMI is entirely bogus, not the least of which is it hinges on the notion of the “average man.”


Sugary drinks linked to 180,000 deaths worldwide - Sugar is a toxin?

Well, yeah?  Listen to the entire video before judging please.  

Domino-Sugar-Granulated-5-lb-bag

"What if you're NOT an athlete?" <-- like most of us?  Sugar is NOT okay, builds up, and causing obesity.

Gatorade


Arctic Zero Frozen Dessert Review - I got time for this.

I doubted it. I did not want to try it. I was told that Artic Zero was "nasty," and that I would hate it.

When I saw a shelf of Artic Zero frozen desserts in our local grocery store, I was half-tempted, but not entirely, because *FISTS IN THE AIR!*  GUYS!?  

It's ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY CALORIES FOR A WHOLE DOG GAMNED PINT OF ICED CREAMED CONFECTIONARY GOODNESS!   

A WHOLE PINT.

  • 150 calories per pint & all natural
  • Fat free & gluten free
  • Lactose intolerant friendly
  • Contains 8 grams of fiber
  • 14 grams of whey protein concentrate
  • If, you eat the whole pint.

arctic zero

If you are a bariatric patient, you ain't eatin' no WHOLE PINT OF NOTHIN'.  Even at my stage, nine years, I don't eat a pint of any one food ever -- not unless I want to take a trip to sleepy-town-next-stop-dump-city-with-a-side-of-NO.

I bought two, which cost me more than I would ever spend on frozen confections but I did it for Science!  The blog.  $4.99 each.  GASP!  I bought Chocolate and Vanilla Maple.  

Last night I noticed that Some Child Of Mine had dug into the Chocolate and I had to save it from it's certain death -- and I stole it back for review.  (Her review - "I'd eat it."  Because she did.  I stole it back.)

First impression, the product is solid like a rock and you must absolutely leave it out for a few minutes and allow it to melt a bit for best results.  It freezes quite hard because of it's high-water level and it's not palatable totally frozen solid. Sccccrrrrraaaaaaappppeeeeee.

Once it's a little bit un-frozen, it's good to go.  My first taste reaction was that of a frozen diet hot chocolate, with no grit, no textural issues, perfectly smooth.  Another similarity might be a diet fudgsicle or the chocolate part of a chocolate and vanilla ice-cream cup.

It could use more sweetness to personal preference, however it is a lower-sugar product and I would NOT want more real sugar added TO it.  The first few tastes were slightly bland, but it was better after that.  I considered adding a packet of flavoring or something to it - perhaps a shake of powdered peanut butter - sugar-free syrup or chopped super dark chocolate would have done the trick.   However I didn't add anything to it, and I ate two servings without anything on it - and was perfectly happy that way.  

Pints
I chose not to write this review until today because I wanted to wait for the full "gut-reaction" from the ingredients - you know - in the name of science - the blog - the farts -

Here are the nutritional stats -

37Nutritionals

Chocolate, Chocolate Peanut Butter,Mint Chocolate Cookie
INGREDIENTS: PURIFIED WATER, WHEY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, ORGANIC CANE SUGAR, CHICORY ROOT, DUTCH PROCESSED COCOA POWDER WITH ALKALI, GUAR GUM, XANTHAN GUM, NATURAL FLAVORS, SEA SALT, MONK FRUIT CONCENTRATE.

Vanilla Maple
INGREDIENTS: PURIFIED WATER, WHEY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, ORGANIC CANE SUGAR, CHICORY ROOT, GUAR GUM, XANTHAN GUM, NATURAL FLAVORS, SEA SALT, MONK FRUIT CONCENTRATE.

I am pleased to say I had little to no reaction to the fiber in the product - and I react to EVERYTHING.  There are many products that I cannot TOUCH (RIP Quest Bars, signed my gut) because of their ingredient profiles.  Thumbs up Arctic Zero.

Next up, Vanilla Maple.

Now, full disclosure - if you are a "typical" dairy ice cream eater - this is not THAT stuff.  This is a frozen diet confection for those of us who DO NOT EAT full-fat dairy ice cream.  

There's a reason I can't eat ice cream.  

(RIP ice cream, signed lactose intolerance via roux en y gastric bypass.)  Dairy ice cream contains lots of high-fat cream content and mouth-feel.  Also, many types of ice cream contain chunks of high-fat candy and high-calorie junk.  This product is a diet confection and contains only 37 calories for a reason.  

Keep that in mind and if you're going to add loads of crap BACK TO IT, why bother?

I'm going to buy a case of all the flavors via Amazon to keep on hand in my chest freezer for those ice-cold cravings.   Because, sometimes I crave it, and I can't have it.

Pouchworthy.  

  • Product - Arctic Zero Frozen Dessert
  • Price -  $3.26 on Amazon  - $4.99 at WalMart
  • Pros - Under 40 calories per serving, 150 for entire pint, 5 grams sugar per serving, 0 fat, 0 lactose, Fat free & gluten free, Lactose intolerant friendly, Contains 8 grams of fiber, 14 grams of whey protein concentrate
  • Cons - Tad pricey, urge to add stuff to it.
  • Rating - Pouchworthy, MM

Bet you forgot about this! Good does good gets good things. #BBGC

image from http://featherfiles.aviary.com/2013-03-14/f77694d11/d6fb81219d024bf49a938464e18e1306_hires.png
Remember that time YOU donated to the Walk From Obesity in 2012 - and helped Team MMBBGC do THIS -

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I promised to give back the prizes that YOU helped me ( and Team MMBGC!) earn!

Look what we did!

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Out of those who donated to Team MMBGC in 2012, I'll be picking WINNERS and posting them VERY SOON!  (It's a huge list!  THANK YOU!) Lucky!  Lucky!

:D

 


Banning large sodas is legal and smart

CNN) -- A state trial judge on Monday blocked New York City's plan for a maximum 16 ounce size for a high-sugar beverage. The ban would have included sodas, energy drinks, fruit drinks and sweetened teas. But it would have excluded alcoholic beverages and drinks that are more than 50% milk, such as lattes. The ban would have applied to restaurants, movie theaters, stadiums and mobile food carts. But it would not have applied to supermarkets and convenience stores, such as 7-Eleven.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg's proposal was met with fierce opposition by the industry and public outrage at the loss of "liberty," the so-called "nanny state" run amok. Beyond all the hype, the industry's vociferous arguments, now adopted by a trial court, are badly flawed.

In fact, the Board of Health has the power, indeed the responsibility, to regulate sugary drinks for the sake of city residents, particularly the poor.