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December 2013 posts

Because this is how we party - I got drilled for the holidays.

For the holidays -- I got dental work.   BEAM.  You know we are PRACTICAL up in here.   You should know I have been putting this off for YEARS.  I needed approximately a cars-worth of work done - and one surgical procedure.  This is going to be a minute of one or two-at-time visits.  

No lie. I had the worst two done a couple weeks ago, and two done yesterday.

Oddly -- I noted that my cyclic left eye twitch stopped immediately when the dentist injected me with novocaine. Perhaps novocaine is a cure for my eye twitch (... brain twitch?!) I only mention that because the eye twitching often precludes my seizure activity, to which I say Give Me More Novocaine?  

I remained Numb In Mah Wips for about six hours - and definitely drooled coffee on myself while attempting to sip and shortly thereafter gave up on lunch.

Dental Work = An Awesome Diet Plan.   *Not that I am dieting because I don't.  

I am doing THIS.  This is yesterday's gym time - -900 calorie burn.  

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*Except I'm back to normal today - and eating old leftover cold rice because I am in week five (...six?) of no kitchen.  

Whelp. 

 


Dietary Supplements cause 20% of liver injury

The terrifying issue about diet supplements and liver failure -- is that those of us who have bariatric surgery are already at a slightly higher risk for liver concerns.   (Go ahead and look it up.)

Some bariatric patients have a history of fatty liver disease, had WLS to help it, and unknowingly make themselves sick again by taking in high levels of toxins!

It's not just diet pills -- you can kill your liver with too much alcohol -- acetaminophen -- but this is scary guys.

Save your liver.  Please.

Continue reading "Dietary Supplements cause 20% of liver injury" »


#fattalk - Special K love yourself marketing

I am all about ending fat talk, and fat shaming, and fat bias.  We can very clear about that.

I love my fat people.  I am forever my 320 pound fat girl.  She is inside me.  She has a memory.  She can return at ANY GIVEN time, fat cells have memory.

The issue I take with this campaign is the marketing of weight loss and diet products like the above, "Special K" - by making us all warm and squishy inside - to self promote. 

*side eye to other companies - and individuals in my WLS community that do this*  

I AM LOOKING AT YOU.

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It's "bullying to yourself."

It's damaging.

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STOP.  

Yes.  

OWN yourself.  LOVE yourself at your size, whatever size it is.  

I also want you to be healthy and to get healthy by any means you choose - but - I do not know whether I necessarily like these businesses tagging diet, wellness, coaching, body wear, etc. products to your curves to make money.  (I know, shut up, Beth.)

You feel "better" (... good enough?) about yourself to do something about your weight, and in-turn buy their product or service because they made you "feel" emotions, a salespitch?  

I watch companies use sabotage as a sales method as well - "love - control - accept your muffintop!?" alongside messages of "how to create the look of six pack abs" no wonder we are confused!  Do not even get me started on plastic surgery.  

I know I am making this bigger than a box of super-refined rice cereal.  

This here is a highly-contrived Multi-Million Dollar Marketing Pitch aimed at make you feel all the feelings.  It's not about the size of your ass.

I don't know.  I am torn.  Again.  As usual.

 

 


Ruben Studdard - "I feel like taking the easy route out is not something I should do."

Wendy Williams is not a nice person.  That's all I have to say about THAT.

Ruben, thank you for being classy and not tearing this woman's FACE OFF.

However - Ruben... DEAR.

"I was raised to believe that I can do anything. I can do all things through Christ that strengthens me and I have to stand firm on that belief. I feel like taking the easy route out is not something I should do. I should make sure I take responsibility for my health, and get in the gym and work it out."

WLS is not a easy route out, WLS is taking responsibility of ones health. 

Thank you, end of conversation.

 


Factors Distinguishing Weight Loss Success and Failure at Five or More Years Post Bariatric Surgery

What makes someone a Weight Loss Success long term after bariatric surgery?  

According to a study by Colleen Cook of BSCI - it's following the rules of your WLS.

I've heard her say it a hundred times at bariatric events - fall back to the RULES of your surgery - because it DOES WORK -

(Nodding in agreement - I am proof.)

Here's the study details from ASMBS/TOS 2013 -

Dietary support after bariatric surgery, along with pre-operative teaching and post-operative management, may mean the difference between weight-loss success and failure for patients with obesity, according to results of an on-line survey presented at the 31st Annual Scientific Meeting of The Obesity Society (OBESITY 2013).

“This study confirms the need to put into place the resources to support people after bariatric surgery, including the dieticians and behavioural therapists who are actively involved with their patients, and can be critical to their success or failure,” stated American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery past president, Scott Shikora, MD, Center for Metabolic Health, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

People who have had bariatric surgery and are complying with the very basic principles of personal accountability, portion control, food intake, vitamins and supplements, proper nutrition and exercise are the ones who have been doing well long-term,” noted lead author Colleen M. Cook, Bariatric Support Centers International, Jordan, Utah, speaking here on November 14.

Cook and colleagues conducted a survey to assess adherence to specific, research-based, behavioural recommendations based on earlier research. Of their 535 total initial respondents, 255 were 5 or more years post-surgery. From this group, they took a final sample of 158 respondents comprised of 117 (74.05%) who reported achieving at least 80% of their excess body weight loss (the Highly Successful group) and 41 (25.9%) who reported achieving less than 40% of their excess body weight loss (the Not Highly Successful group).

The groups were compared on self-reported behaviours, including dietary intake, physical exercise, attendance at surgical follow-up visits, and participation in bariatric support groups.

The Highly Successful group reported significantly higher rates of compliance with dietary recommendations (P< .001); fewer total calories per day (1511.9 kCals versus 2190.0 kCals, P< .001 ); consuming a higher percentage of calories from protein (49% vs 36%; P< .001); higher frequency of eating protein first (P =.007); and lower percentage of calories from carbohydrates (31% vs 40%; P = .001).

The Highly Successful group was much more likely to regularly weigh themselves (P< .001); attend support groups (P = .002); and take supplemental multivitamins (P = .029), including calcium (P = .004), iron (P = .011), and B12 (P = .001).

The Highly Successful group was significantly less likely to eat mindlessly (P< .001); to “graze” (P< .001); to eat in front of the TV (= .002); to eat fast food (P< .001); and to eat food high in sugar (P< .001).

The groups also differed significantly on carbonated beverage (P = .02) and caffeine (P = .005) drinking patterns. The Highly Successful group reported significantly more physical activity at least several times per week than the Not Highly Successful group (P< .001).

The researchers found no significant differences, however, for ingestion of percentage calories from fat or the frequency of eating at sit-down restaurants, drinking calorie-laden liquids, or attending surgical clinic follow-ups.

Participants in this study averaged 51.7 years of age and 8.8 years post-surgery; 96% were female, 59% were married, and 89% were white. Both groups had similar demographics.

Funding for this study was provided by Bariatric Support Centers International.

[Presentation title: Factors Distinguishing Weight Loss Success and Failure at Five or More Years Post Bariatric Surgery. Abstract A-366-P]


Proof exercise works!

My weight - has not changed in six months - I am maintaining from 144-150.

But this, this is new.   I had zero definition in my body before.   

Thigh muscle

It's the little things, honestly.  A little change makes a huge difference - the fact that I can finally see change - makes the work WORTH IT.

 


Miranda Lambert - "My Diet Is Better Than Gastric Bypass"

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Miranda Lambert, you're not making friends with your target market  (...Did You Notice That 70% of America is Overweight?!) with these ridiculous articles.

Via Life & Style Magazine - 

The speculation all started when Miranda showed up at the AMA Awards showing off her extreme weight loss. She reportedly dropped 25 pounds from her 155-pound frame in a very short span of time, which led to rumors that she may have secretly gotten her stomach stapled.

However, Life & Style’s report claims that Miranda is now firing back against the rumors, and claiming that neither plastic surgery nor a gastric bypass had anything to do with her weight loss. Apparently, she did NOT lose 30 pounds in 8 weeks via a shortcut, but old-fashioned hard work. Eh. It’s still difficult to believe, but with celebrities, you never know – they have a ton of free time and access to the best trainers and the best food. It’s possible that Miranda just worked really, really hard to lose all that weight so quickly, even if it sounds a tad bit unbelievable.

Nobody really cares if you "got your stomach stapled," and those of us who understand "stomach stapling" know that you could not have it done at 5' 4" and 155 lbs.  

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http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/obesity/BMI/bmicalc.htm

Frankly, as someone who is nearly THAT size - I am a bit miffed that people would suggest bariatric surgery at a weight that I have been told is "too skinny."  

This is so silly.  

 

 


Fit Mom can tell how healthy you are just by looking at you.

I (again) feel the urge to take arm selfies and just flap my batwings at this woman.  Fwap.  Fwap.  Fwap.

You cannot tell how "healthy" anyone is by "just looking."

I am the PERFECT example of that.

I am 144-148 lbs of pure fwappity-just-growing-muscle who spends 3-5 days inside a gym and a photograph would confuse the hell out of her.  

"What is this just nearly overweight person?!  What is all of this hanging off of your abdomen?!"

Stop talking.  Just stop.