Posts categorized "Eating" Feed

Twelve hundred

I've been food journaling.

Here is the damage.  

Screen Shot 2017-01-26 at 10.38.35 AM

That's about 1500 - 1700 calories a day, with nearly everything in my apathy diet included.

I am remaining in the 170 - 173 pound spot.  Obviously, this calorie range keeps me squarely in this weight range.  (I have been here for a year and a half?)

I go from 170 to 175.  I get excited to see 1-6-9, and then, poof, right back into 170's.  I have always shared (in my BBGC support group) that I believe in 10 - 12 calories per pound maintains my size.

Which also means, if I am EVER going to shake off this excess, I must drop back the calories OR ramp up my daily activity by at least 500 - 700 calories per day.  

HUGE APATHETIC SIGH FILLED WITH TOAST.  "BUT I DON'T WANNNNNNAAAAAA EAT LESS."  I have become way too comfortable with over-eating.  I can eat me some 1700 calories with ease.  I can polish off a bowl of Anycarbs! like nobodies business.  Hand me Anycarbs! (...except cereal and milk, gag) and I'll overeat it for you!  

What made me realize this?  One of my daughters decided to start looking at portions.  She pulled out the measuring cups.  And DOG KNOWS I AM A PROFESSIONAL MEASURER OF ALL THINGS NUTRITIVE and I can tell you how many calories are in all the things -- but -- do I bother measuring my own foods? 

Nah.  scoop scoop scoop 

When I looked at her wee bowl of pasta and realized (for the millionth time) that 1/2 cup of pasta is only > this < much?  And I have been serving myself with > this < much stomach + THIS MUCH + just because it's there?  Thud.

Last night while watching My 600 LB Life -- I noted that Dr. Now puts all the patients on a 1200 calorie diet.  It works.  What I am doing, is not working.  It's maintaining my obesity.  What does this mean for me?  I am going to make a conscious effort to aim for 1200 calories.  I know that my aiming for that I may or may not - but it's not a huge deal.  If I can hit it some days, I'll make progress.  My goal is 150 pounds, so a loss of 20 pounds. To do that, I'll need to CUT THE CARBS back.  I may need to cut out a meal or snack or three.  Add shakes in?  Maybe.  I haven't "dieted" in so very long it's hard to even consider?  I see lots of my online friends having great success with super low carb plans, some even KETO, but, I need something that is very flexible - even - ready to go - with no planning.  I'm just ... chaotic.  But I'll follow anything and be likely to succeed if I can get with it, you know?

Are you following any plans right now?  Do you have excess weight to lose?  


Before You Spend $26,000 on Weight-Loss Surgery, Do This - What?

Agreed.

It was the first thing we all did BEFORE weight loss surgery 13 - 15 years ago ANYWAY. Because, it works.

The problem *is* the flipping ________ is addictive and NOBODY GETS THAT PART OF THE EQUATION, and until THAT is figured out?

THE ANSWER IS WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY.

New York Times Op -

Before You Spend $26,000 on Weight-Loss Surgery, Do This

Download Before You Spend $26,000 on Weight-Loss Surgery, Do This - The New York Times

Earlier this year, the Food and Drug Administration approved a new weight-loss procedure in which a thin tube, implanted in the stomach, ejects food from the body before all the calories can be absorbed.

Some have called it “medically sanctioned bulimia,” and it is the latest in a desperate search for new ways to stem the rising tides of obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Roughly one-third of adult Americans are now obese; two-thirds are overweight; and diabetes afflicts some 29 million. Another 86 million Americans have a condition called pre-diabetes. None of the proposed solutions have made a dent in these epidemics.

Recently, 45 international medical and scientific societies, including the American Diabetes Association, called for bariatric surgery to become a standard option for diabetes treatment. The procedure, until now seen as a last resort, involves stapling, binding or removing part of the stomach to help people shed weight. It costs $11,500 to $26,000, which many insurance plans won’t pay and which doesn’t include the costs of office visits for maintenance or postoperative complications. And up to 17 percent of patients will have complications, which can include nutrient deficiencies, infections and intestinal blockages.

It is nonsensical that we’re expected to prescribe these techniques to our patients while the medical guidelines don’t include another better, safer and far cheaper method: a diet low in carbohydrates.

Once a fad diet, the safety and efficacy of the low-carb diet have now been verified in more than 40 clinical trials on thousands of subjects. Given that the government projects that one in three Americans (and one in two of those of Hispanic origin) will be given a diagnosis of diabetes by 2050, it’s time to give this diet a closer look.

When someone has diabetes, he can no longer produce sufficient insulin to process glucose (sugar) in the blood. To lower glucose levels, diabetics need to increase insulin, either by taking medication that increases their own endogenous production or by injecting insulin directly. A patient with diabetes can be on four or five different medications to control blood glucose, with an annual price tag of thousands of dollars.

Yet there’s another, more effective way to lower glucose levels: Eat less of it.

Glucose is the breakdown product of carbohydrates, which are found principally in wheat, rice, corn, potatoes, fruit and sugars. Restricting these foods keeps blood glucose low. Moreover, replacing those carbohydrates with healthy protein and fats, the most naturally satiating of foods, often eliminates hunger. People can lose weight without starving themselves, or even counting calories.

Most doctors — and the diabetes associations — portray diabetes as an incurable disease, presaging a steady decline that may include kidney failure, amputations and blindness, as well as life-threatening heart attacks and stroke. Yet the literature on low-carbohydrate intervention for diabetes tells another story. For instance, a two-week study of 10 obese patients with Type 2 diabetes found that their glucose levels normalized and insulin sensitivity was improved by 75 percent after they went on a low-carb diet.

At our obesity clinics, we’ve seen hundreds of patients who, after cutting down on carbohydrates, lose weight and get off their medications. One patient in his 50s was a brick worker so impaired by diabetes that he had retired from his job. He came to see one of us last winter, 100 pounds overweight and panicking. He’d been taking insulin prescribed by a doctor who said he would need to take it for the rest of his life. Yet even with insurance coverage, his drugs cost hundreds of dollars a month, which he knew he couldn’t afford, any more than he could bariatric surgery.

Instead, we advised him to stop eating most of his meals out of boxes packed with processed flour and grains, replacing them with meat, eggs, nuts and even butter. Within five months, his blood-sugar levels had normalized, and he was back to working part-time. Today, he no longer needs to take insulin.

Another patient, in her 60s, had been suffering from Type 2 diabetes for 12 years. She lost 35 pounds in a year on a low-carb diet, and was able to stop taking her three medications, which included more than 100 units of insulin daily.

One small trial found that 44 percent of low-carb dieters were able to stop taking one or more diabetes medications after only a few months, compared with 11 percent of a control group following a moderate-carb, lower-fat, calorie-restricted diet. A similarly small trial reported those numbers as 31 percent versus 0 percent. And in these as well as another, larger, trial, hemoglobin A1C, which is the primary marker for a diabetes diagnosis, improved significantly more on the low-carb diet than on a low-fat or low-calorie diet. Of course, the results are dependent on patients’ ability to adhere to low-carb diets, which is why some studies have shown that the positive effects weaken over time.

A low-carbohydrate diet was in fact standard treatment for diabetes throughout most of the 20th century, when the condition was recognized as one in which “the normal utilization of carbohydrate is impaired,” according to a 1923 medical text. When pharmaceutical insulin became available in 1922, the advice changed, allowing moderate amounts of carbohydrates in the diet.

Yet in the late 1970s, several organizations, including the Department of Agriculture and the diabetes association, began recommending a high-carb, low-fat diet, in line with the then growing (yet now refuted) concern that dietary fat causes coronary artery disease. That advice has continued for people with diabetes despite more than a dozen peer-reviewed clinical trials over the past 15 years showing that a diet low in carbohydrates is more effective than one low in fat for reducing both blood sugar and most cardiovascular risk factors.

The diabetes association has yet to acknowledge this sizable body of scientific evidence. Its current guidelines find “no conclusive evidence” to recommend a specific carbohydrate limit. The organization even tells people with diabetes to maintain carbohydrate consumption, so that patients on insulin don’t see their blood sugar fall too low. That condition, known as hypoglycemia, is indeed dangerous, yet it can better be avoided by restricting carbs and eliminating the need for excess insulin in the first place. Encouraging patients with diabetes to eat a high-carb diet is effectively a prescription for ensuring a lifelong dependence on medication.

At the annual diabetes association convention in New Orleans this summer, there wasn’t a single prominent reference to low-carb treatment among the hundreds of lectures and posters publicizing cutting-edge research. Instead, we saw scores of presentations on expensive medications for blood sugar, obesity and liver problems, as well as new medical procedures, including that stomach-draining system, temptingly named AspireAssist, and another involving “mucosal resurfacing” of the digestive tract by burning the inside of the duodenum with a hot balloon.

We owe our patients with diabetes more than a lifetime of insulin injections and risky surgical procedures. To combat diabetes and spare a great deal of suffering, as well as the $322 billion in diabetes-related costs incurred by the nation each year, doctors should follow a version of that timeworn advice against doing unnecessary harm — and counsel their patients to first, do low carbs.

Sarah Hallberg is medical director of the weight loss program at Indiana University Health Arnett, adjunct professor at the school of medicine, director of the Nutrition Coalition and medical director of a start-up developing nutrition-based medical interventions. Osama Hamdy is the medical director of the obesity and inpatient diabetes programs at the Joslin Diabetes Center at Harvard Medical School. A version of this op-ed appears in print on September 11, 2016, on page SR1 of the New York edition with the headline: The Old-Fashioned Way to Treat Diabetes.


Permitters and Restrictors.

 

Because this is how we party - I got drilled for the holidays.

For the holidays -- I got dental work.   BEAM.  You know we are PRACTICAL up in here.   You should know I have been putting this off for YEARS.  I needed approximately a cars-worth of work done - and one surgical procedure.  This is going to be a minute of one or two-at-time visits.  

No lie. I had the worst two done a couple weeks ago, and two done yesterday.

Oddly -- I noted that my cyclic left eye twitch stopped immediately when the dentist injected me with novocaine. Perhaps novocaine is a cure for my eye twitch (... brain twitch?!) I only mention that because the eye twitching often precludes my seizure activity, to which I say Give Me More Novocaine?  

I remained Numb In Mah Wips for about six hours - and definitely drooled coffee on myself while attempting to sip and shortly thereafter gave up on lunch.

Dental Work = An Awesome Diet Plan.   *Not that I am dieting because I don't.  

I am doing THIS.  This is yesterday's gym time - -900 calorie burn.  

1554381_680070952037316_1333027473_n
1554381_680070952037316_1333027473_n

*Except I'm back to normal today - and eating old leftover cold rice because I am in week five (...six?) of no kitchen.  

Whelp. 

 


Fat Letter on Halloween night - No Candy For You, Kid! Added video with interview -

A woman, Cheryl, in Fargo, North Dakota has decided to take Childhood Obesity into her own hands on Halloween, and pass out this letter --  What?!  

Yo, lady -  it's not our business.

Pass out toys.  Shut off your lights.  This letter makes you a tool.    Then again, I think this whole thing is a prank for radio station PR now that I have had a day to look at it.

Screen Shot 2013-10-30 at 7.50.05 AM

Valley News Live - KVLY/KXJB - Fargo/Grand Forks


Burger King Satisfries with 40% Less Fat and 30% Less Calories But Sounds Like XXX

Burger King Fries
Don't get too excited -- although Burger King removed 40% of the dietary fat and 30% of the calories from their french fries -- the little buggers still contain 60% of the fat and 70% of the calories.  That means that many people will validate this Menu Choice By Overeating It or dipping it into sugary ketchup and killing those lost calories.  Some non-fry eaters will simply start eating fries!  
What is the difference between regular BK Fries and SATISFRIES?

Burger King executives say people won't be able to tell that Satisfries are lower in calories. It says they use exactly the same ingredients as its regular fries — potatoes, oil and batter. To keep kitchen operations simple, they're even made in the same fryers and cooked for the same amount of time as regular fries.

The difference, Burger King says, is that it adjusts the proportions of different ingredients for the batter to block out more oil. The company declined to be more specific. Another difference, the crinkle-cut shape, is in part so workers will be able to easily distinguish them from the regular fries when they're deep frying them together.

Tumblr_makol45Wr01qk5kb7


"The concept of taking an indulgent food and removing some of the guilt isn't new, of course. Supermarkets are filled with baked Lay's potato chips, 100-calorie packs of Oreos and other less fattening versions of popular treats. Such creations play on people's inability to give up their food vices, even as they struggle to eat better. The idea is to create something that skimps on calories, but not on taste."  
Burger-king-king
There's a problem though - because even people like me who eat the stupid calorie bombs now and then on limited calorie diet?  WE WON'T ASK FOR AN ORDER OF 'SATISFRIES' BECAUSE IT SOUNDS LIKE A SEX TOY.
Sticker,375x360


Recommended Carbohydrate Levels After Gastric Bypass

Via Bariatric Times -

Btlogo1a

After you read this study, let's discuss:  

  • Did your nutritionist give YOU guidance in regards to carbohydrate intake after your roux en y gastric bypass surgery?
  • Background: Exact carbohydrate levels needed for the bariatric patient population have not yet been defined. The aim of this study was to correlate carbohydrate intake to percent excess weight loss for the bariatric patient population based on a cross-sectional study. The author also aimed to review the related literature.
  • Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted, along with a review of the literature, about patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass at least 1 year previously. Patients had their percentage of excess weight loss calculated and energy intake was examined based on data collected with a four-day food recall. Patients were divided into two groups: 1) patients who consumed 130g/day or more of carbohydrates and 2) patients who consumed less than 130g/day of carbohydrates. 
  • Limitations: The literature review was limited to papers published since 1993. 
  • Results: Patients who consumed 130g/day or more of carbohydrates presented a lower percent excess weight loss than the other group (p= 0.038). In the review of the literature, the author found that six months after surgery patients can ingest about 850kcal/day of carbohydrates, 30 percent being ingested as lipids. A protein diet with at least 60g/day is needed. On this basis, patients should consume about 90g/day of carbohydrates. After the first postoperative year, energy intake is about 1,300kcal/day and protein consumption should be increased. We can, therefore, establish nearly 130g/day of carbohydrates (40% of their energy intake) 
  • Conclusions: Based on these studies, the author recommends that 90g/day is adequate for patients who are six months post Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and less than 130g/day is adequate for patients who are one year or more post surgery. 
  • The author concludes that maintaining carbohydrate consumption to moderate quantities and adequate protein intake seems to be fundamental to ensure the benefits from bariatric surgery.

Faria_table6_march13

http://bariatrictimes.com/recommended-levels-of-carbohydrate-after-bariatric-surgery/


What does 2000 calories look like!?

I might be slightly disturbed by this, and it is blatantly obvious why I was 320 lbs, and even more clear How Easy It Is To Regain Weight After Bariatric Surgery.

Just a few calories a day - it adds up so damned fast.

My before-WLS diet would easily dwarf this 2000-calorie business.  

Related articles


Trigger warning - Aspire Assist Aspiration Therapy - Sucking vomit out of a tube for weight loss.

"Losing weight shouldn’t take the fun out of life – dinners out with friends, a glass of wine with dinner, or a home-cooked meal with your family. With the AspireAssist, there are no burdensome restrictions on what and when you can eat and drink. Continue to eat the foods you love – and as you start to lose weight, gradually learn how to make healthy choices to match your leaner, healthier body!"

With the Aspire Assist Aspiration Therapy System, you can STILL EAT the foods you crave!  Want that half-gallon of ice cream?  Feel free to dig in!

Nom those noms!

Just twenty minutes after your meal -- you can discreetly withdraw a portion (OF VOMIT) of your partially digested meal THROUGH YOUR ABDOMEN and dispose of it without the hassle of you know:  lower digestion,  fecal production and weight gain!

Digestive_enzymes

I thought this was an article from The Onion.

It's not.  It's for real.

Jezebel -

Dean Kamen, the inventor of the Segway, a machine that exists to stop people from walking, has teamed up with Aspire Bariatrics (that name — shudder) to apply for a patent on a pump that will suck food and beverage straight out of your stomach and rids it from your intestines/life.

Please hold me again.  I'm a Bariatric Patient that is FUCKING TERRIFIED by the thought of giving people the opportunity for controlled bulimia.  I am still wary that this can't be for real -

Screen Shot 2013-01-08 at 9.02.45 AM

The Aspire Assist Aspiration Therapy System works by reducing the calories absorbed by the body. After eating, food travels to the stomach immediately, where it is temporarily stored and the digestion process begins. Over the first hour after a meal, the stomach begins breaking down the food, and then passes the food on to the intestines, where calories are absorbed. The AspireAssist allows patients to remove about 30% of the food from the stomach before the calories are absorbed into the body, causing weight loss.
To begin Aspiration Therapy, a specially designed tube, known as the A-Tube™, is placed in the stomach. The A-Tube is a thin silicone rubber tube that connects the inside of the stomach directly to a discreet, poker-chip sized Skin-Port on the outside of the abdomen. The Skin-Port has a valve that can be opened or closed to control the flow of stomach contents. The patient empties a portion of stomach contents after each meal through this tube by connecting a small, handheld device to the Skin-Port. The emptying process is called “aspiration”.
The aspiration process is performed about 20 minutes after the entire meal is consumed and takes 5 to 10 minutes to complete. Because aspiration only removes a third of the food, the body still receives the calories it needs to function. For optimal weight loss, patients should aspirate after each major meal (about 3 times per day)  GAHHHH!!!!!!!!!!! initially. Over time, as patients learn to eat more healthfully, they can reduce the frequency of aspirations.

Top 50 Emotional Eating Blogs - cue thud and human puddling.

I found this list  of the "Top 50 Emotional Eating Blogs 2012" through a blog I found via fitbloggin' this year.  This. list. is. amazing.  I'll share half - you can visit the link for the rest

Screen Shot 2013-01-03 at 8.00.21 AM

1. Life with Cake – Greta Gleissner is a psychotherapist specializing in the treatment of eating disorders. Life with Cake is a personal blog about her recovery from an eating disorder and includes advice about addressing urges to eat emotionally.

2.  Karen C.L. Anderson – Karen C.L. Anderson writes about what happens after achieving “weight-loss success”. She talks about self-acceptance, how to truly feel your feelings, and eating mindfully.

3. The Begin Within Blog – The Begin Within Blog is a blog for individuals recovering from eating disorders. The blog covers a wide range of topics from binge eating to intuitive eating to kindness and compassion.

4. Savor the Blog – Savor the Blog expands on the themes found in Savor, the popular book by Thich Nhat Hanh and Dr. Lilian Cheung. Many of the posts are about mindful eating, while others address the emotional reasons we make our food choices.

5. A Weigh Out – A Weigh Out is a blog written by a number of contributors — all of them professionals in the field of nutrition, emotional eating, and eating disorder therapy. While some of the posts are personal reflections by the coaches and therapists, a number of the posts include advice about addressing emotions in our lives that can affect health — and diet.

Continue reading "Top 50 Emotional Eating Blogs - cue thud and human puddling." »


30 Days

meltingmama has logged in for 30 days in a row!

That's a miracle.

I never follow through with a food journal  (we know this through past history) thirty days is a big freaking deal.

As much as I bitch, moan and complain about it, food journaling works.  

Journaling shows me immediately where the concern areas are -- and Where I Am Screwing Up.  It's glaringly, painfully obvious what needs to change and why I don't lose weight when I think I should.  Because I am Too Busy Grazing Bites Of Crackers - Cheese - Cheese - and How About That Cheese?  As soon as I make myself accountable to writing it down, at least 75-95% of the time - I do it so much better.  

I screw up constantly. 

I break rules.

I am a huge mess.

But. 

I can do this.

I can do it
I have gone from 182 lbs to 165 lbs since my last OMGFREAKOUT weigh in.  It can work.  I'm not dieting.  I'm not really trying.  I am just checking in everyday and writing down my intake.

Join me if you want?


Stress triggers eating problems - WHATSTRESS?!?!??!?!?!?

Shocked Comic Face
Huffington Post - 

While the holidays typically come with a great deal of celebration and joy, they can also bring up feelings of loss, regret or depression. And that's the problem: no matter the emotional response, an emotional eater will often turn back to food.

"Many people use eating as a way to cope with difficult emotions, not only bad ones, but also happiness, excitement and celebration, for example," says Alexis Cona, a clinical psychologist in private practice and a researcher at New York Obesity Research Center.

Researchers believe that many emotional eaters turn to food to numb emotions that are too painful or difficult to process. As Cona explains, it can be a mindless cycle in which an emotional eater suddenly finds himself in front of the fridge, not quite knowing how he got there.

Family time during the holidays can be a particular challenge, as many disordered eating habits begin with poor boundaries between family members, Cona says. Preparing oneself for difficult and triggering interactions might be an important aspect of getting ready for the holidays.

What's more, during this season, food is more plentiful. Many people have favorite, traditional treats that they only eat during this time of year.

"There are all sorts of memories associated with family favorites -- these foods are imbued with expectations," says Ellen Shuman, president of the Binge Eating Disorder Association and an emotional and binge eating recovery coach. "That feeling of deprivation can make an emotional eater feel like they have to eat their fill in that moment. They become forbidden foods -- and that brings out the rebel in many emotional eaters."

Instead, Shuman counsels patients not to have once-a-year foods. If they love a certain dish, they should make it occasionally all year long to avoid that panicked feeling of scarcity.

So what's someone with a history of stress-based eating to do as the holidays loom large?

First of all, work on mindfulness. Cona asks her patients to check in with themselves before they eat anything. Do you feel physiologically hungry? Rate your hunger on a scale. And if you aren't actually hungry, but you want to eat, think about what you might be feeling and what underlying desire is at the bottom of the impulse to eat.

Cona also recommends practicing kindness to oneself, especially in the aftermath of an overindulgence. "Trying to find acceptance can be challenging, especially in a society that condemns us for having eaten this way; especially if our bodies don't look the way society says they should. But it's important not beat ourselves up over it. If this happens, try to learn from it. Don't shame yourself."

But Shuman adds, you may not be the only person you need to forgive. Letting go of painful family history could help prevent the emotional eater's cycle. "Keep in mind that you don't have to spend the holidays with your history with Mom -- just with Mom in that moment."

 


Virtually Anorexic

Virtually Anorexic -

An alarming number of young women are using dangerous pro-anorexia websites that encourage users to "starve for perfection," according to a new study.

This - is even prevalent in the WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY COMMUNITY.  

Shocking?  No.  Not at all.    

You must realize that so many bariatric patients are ED patients in recovery (...or not!) and some many are seeking to be accepted and to get acceptance of their behaviors and ...

A LOT OF IT IS NOT OKAY.  


Weight gain - calories - two crackers a day!

"The newest insanity to hit the weight loss circuit.. 1-2lbs a yr or up to 10lbs in 5 yrs if you..... Lick the peanut butter off the spoon daily, eat 2 crackers daily, lick your fingers when eating chips.... INSANITY"

Saltines

I know exactly what this  blogger is referring to - I attended and recorded the event where the discussion took place.  

Continue reading "Weight gain - calories - two crackers a day!" »


Atkins Frozen Meals in WalMart

Screen Shot 2012-12-07 at 11.48.53 AM

Hey, Atkins?  How did I not know about THESE?

Please to HAVE THEM IN MY WALMART, yesterday.  Or delivery?   Yes please?

481755_3657300366175_1727013508_n

I. live. on. frozen. meals.  

I am entirely serious:  

I purchase 2-3 meals for consumption 5-7 days a week, I am for about a 1200-1400 calorie intake.  I am not supposed to cook, unsupervised. <---- the link explains.

I am your target customer.  I spend days looking for lower-carb options.

NOW.

Thanks!  *skips away*


Do you GAIN weight during the holidays?

It is a common idea that people gain weight during the holiday season, and a typical excuse for doing so.

Holiday-weight-gain
What kind of things do you tell yourself?

"I am expected to eat this fudge, cake, pie, grandmas-cookies, holiday-fare, what-have-you, so it's not MY fault that I gain 5-10-15 pounds this holiday season."  (Lies.)

"Everyone WANTS my special holiday candy that I make every year.  I have to make it."  (Bull.)

"I HAVE to cook the pies, holiday breads, sugar cookies, church pot luck foods, party foods, etc, so you can't blame me for gaining."  (LIIIIIES.)

"This candy is only available during this season, I have to buy it and eat it now, or I won't get it."  (Get. OVER. It.)

First thing I need to tell you?  Your pies?  Kind of suck.  Nobody really likes them.  We eat them because you make them, and don't want to make you feel bad because they were left untouched.  Nobody really likes the pies anyway. 

Turns out, that unless you really go overboard -- the caloric damage done in the holiday season is about a pound.

Oh.  Not. a. big. deal. at. all.  So why are we making up so many justifications for excess in the season of excess?  Just... because we can?

I guess that might be good enough reason for some.

Screen Shot 2012-12-02 at 12.23.59 PM
I am not willing to take on a liquid diet, diet pills, snort energy powder, or spend hour upon hour in the gym on January 1st to rationalize my baklava habit or 96 ounce bag of M + M's for the next four weeks.   (Which, by the way, isn't happening.)

Thanks, but no thanks.  I had weight loss surgery to AVOID fad diets, crash diets and beyond.

I can handle a pound of weight gain.  I can do that in two hours.  I have bowels of steel.  RAWR.

Washington Post-

A classic study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that, despite some pretty big claims about weight gain, the average American gains less than a pound during the holiday season. 

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health had seen claims on the news that the average American would gain somewhere between eight and 10 pounds during the holidays. Studies that rely on self-reporting find Americans estimating they gain five pounds during the time period.

The researchers decided to investigate, recruiting 200 people between ages 19 and 82. The sample was representative of the United States in terms of the prevalence of overweight and obese individuals. 

The individuals came in to be weighed in September or October, and then again in February or March. The reserachers found that, on average, the participants gained .37 kilograms, or 0.81 pounds. 

“The subjects believed they had gained four times as much weight as their actual holiday weight gain of 0.37 kg,” the researchers conclude. “Fewer than 10 percent of subjects gained 2.3 kg or more, and more than half of all measurements of weight after the initial one were within 1 kg of the previous measurement.”

N Engl J Med. 2000 Mar 23;342(12):861-7.
A prospective study of holiday weight gain.

BACKGROUND:

It is commonly asserted that the average American gains 5 lb (2.3 kg) or more over the holiday period between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day, yet few data support this statement.

METHODS:

To estimate actual holiday-related weight variation, we measured body weight in a convenience sample of 195 adults. The subjects were weighed four times at intervals of six to eight weeks, so that weight change was determined for three periods: preholiday (from late September or early October to mid-November), holiday (from mid-November to early or mid-January), and postholiday (from early or mid-January to late February or early March). A final measurement of body weight was obtained in 165 subjects the following September or October. Data on other vital signs and self-reported health measures were obtained from the patients in order to mask the main outcome of interest.

RESULTS:

The mean (+/-SD) weight increased significantly during the holiday period (gain, 0.37+/-1.52 kg; P<0.001), but not during the preholiday period (gain, 0.18+/-1.49 kg; P=0.09) or the postholiday period (loss, 0.07+/-1.14 kg; P=0.36). As compared with their weight in late September or early October, the study subjects had an average net weight gain of 0.48+/-2.22 kg in late February or March (P=0.003). Between February or March and the next September or early October, there was no significant additional change in weight (gain, 0.21 kg+/-2.3 kg; P=0.13) for the 165 participants who returned for follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

The average holiday weight gain is less than commonly asserted. Since this gain is not reversed during the spring or summer months, the net 0.48-kg weight gain in the fall and winter probably contributes to the increase in body weight that frequently occurs during adulthood.

 

Visit Netrition.com for a wide selection of nutritional supplements, weightloss, bodybuilding and low carbohydrate items.


Eat-Rite False food-label information

New York News | NYC Breaking News

According to the labels, they're incredibly low in carbohydrates, calories, and fat. They don't taste like diet food.

THIS MAKES ME FUME.

Lisa Lillian, known as Hungry Girl has her own show on the Food Network, writes cookbooks, and a daily email devoted to guilt-free eating.  She heard from a lot of people that they were suspicious of this pizza.

We took the pizza and some other Eat-Rite products to a certified laboratory and had them tested. The tests found the Chicago Deep Dish Pizza Uno, which the label claims is 210 Calories really has 583 calories. The claim of 6 grams of fat is also bogus. Tests found 29 grams of fat.  Instead of 7 grams of carbohydrates, there are 53 grams.  We also tested Eat-Rite's Pizza Duo and got almost identical results, 577 calories, 28 grams of fat, and 53 grams of carbohydrates.

It's not just the pizza. Eat-Rite's Chic-Wich Sandwich, which the label says has 220 calories, 4 grams of fat, actually has almost double the calories and five times as much fat. The same goes for the Crusty Baked Mac-Cheese, 465 calories, and 23 grams of fat. We contacted Eat-Rite in Clear Lake California three times, and sent them copies of our test results.

We asked to see any proof they have for the claims on their labels, but the company has not responded.

Read more: http://www.myfoxny.com/story/18071984/false-nut#ixzz2C72n6NYp

Screen Shot 2012-11-13 at 9.18.16 AM