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Factors Distinguishing Weight Loss Success and Failure at Five or More Years Post Bariatric Surgery

What makes someone a Weight Loss Success long term after bariatric surgery?  

According to a study by Colleen Cook of BSCI - it's following the rules of your WLS.

I've heard her say it a hundred times at bariatric events - fall back to the RULES of your surgery - because it DOES WORK -

(Nodding in agreement - I am proof.)

Here's the study details from ASMBS/TOS 2013 -

Dietary support after bariatric surgery, along with pre-operative teaching and post-operative management, may mean the difference between weight-loss success and failure for patients with obesity, according to results of an on-line survey presented at the 31st Annual Scientific Meeting of The Obesity Society (OBESITY 2013).

“This study confirms the need to put into place the resources to support people after bariatric surgery, including the dieticians and behavioural therapists who are actively involved with their patients, and can be critical to their success or failure,” stated American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery past president, Scott Shikora, MD, Center for Metabolic Health, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

People who have had bariatric surgery and are complying with the very basic principles of personal accountability, portion control, food intake, vitamins and supplements, proper nutrition and exercise are the ones who have been doing well long-term,” noted lead author Colleen M. Cook, Bariatric Support Centers International, Jordan, Utah, speaking here on November 14.

Cook and colleagues conducted a survey to assess adherence to specific, research-based, behavioural recommendations based on earlier research. Of their 535 total initial respondents, 255 were 5 or more years post-surgery. From this group, they took a final sample of 158 respondents comprised of 117 (74.05%) who reported achieving at least 80% of their excess body weight loss (the Highly Successful group) and 41 (25.9%) who reported achieving less than 40% of their excess body weight loss (the Not Highly Successful group).

The groups were compared on self-reported behaviours, including dietary intake, physical exercise, attendance at surgical follow-up visits, and participation in bariatric support groups.

The Highly Successful group reported significantly higher rates of compliance with dietary recommendations (P< .001); fewer total calories per day (1511.9 kCals versus 2190.0 kCals, P< .001 ); consuming a higher percentage of calories from protein (49% vs 36%; P< .001); higher frequency of eating protein first (P =.007); and lower percentage of calories from carbohydrates (31% vs 40%; P = .001).

The Highly Successful group was much more likely to regularly weigh themselves (P< .001); attend support groups (P = .002); and take supplemental multivitamins (P = .029), including calcium (P = .004), iron (P = .011), and B12 (P = .001).

The Highly Successful group was significantly less likely to eat mindlessly (P< .001); to “graze” (P< .001); to eat in front of the TV (= .002); to eat fast food (P< .001); and to eat food high in sugar (P< .001).

The groups also differed significantly on carbonated beverage (P = .02) and caffeine (P = .005) drinking patterns. The Highly Successful group reported significantly more physical activity at least several times per week than the Not Highly Successful group (P< .001).

The researchers found no significant differences, however, for ingestion of percentage calories from fat or the frequency of eating at sit-down restaurants, drinking calorie-laden liquids, or attending surgical clinic follow-ups.

Participants in this study averaged 51.7 years of age and 8.8 years post-surgery; 96% were female, 59% were married, and 89% were white. Both groups had similar demographics.

Funding for this study was provided by Bariatric Support Centers International.

[Presentation title: Factors Distinguishing Weight Loss Success and Failure at Five or More Years Post Bariatric Surgery. Abstract A-366-P]

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